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Member "apache-tomcat-8.5.58/webapps/docs/appdev/web.xml.txt" (10 Sep 2020, 6416 Bytes) of package /windows/www/apache-tomcat-8.5.58-windows-x64.zip:


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    1 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
    2 <!--
    3   Licensed to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) under one or more
    4   contributor license agreements.  See the NOTICE file distributed with
    5   this work for additional information regarding copyright ownership.
    6   The ASF licenses this file to You under the Apache License, Version 2.0
    7   (the "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance with
    8   the License.  You may obtain a copy of the License at
    9 
   10       http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
   11 
   12   Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
   13   distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
   14   WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
   15   See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
   16   limitations under the License.
   17 -->
   18 
   19 <!DOCTYPE web-app
   20     PUBLIC "-//Sun Microsystems, Inc.//DTD Web Application 2.3//EN"
   21     "http://java.sun.com/dtd/web-app_2_3.dtd">
   22 
   23 <web-app>
   24 
   25 
   26     <!-- General description of your web application -->
   27 
   28     <display-name>My Web Application</display-name>
   29     <description>
   30       This is version X.X of an application to perform
   31       a wild and wonderful task, based on servlets and
   32       JSP pages.  It was written by Dave Developer
   33       (dave@mycompany.com), who should be contacted for
   34       more information.
   35     </description>
   36 
   37 
   38     <!-- Context initialization parameters that define shared
   39          String constants used within your application, which
   40          can be customized by the system administrator who is
   41          installing your application.  The values actually
   42          assigned to these parameters can be retrieved in a
   43          servlet or JSP page by calling:
   44 
   45              String value =
   46                getServletContext().getInitParameter("name");
   47 
   48          where "name" matches the <param-name> element of
   49          one of these initialization parameters.
   50 
   51          You can define any number of context initialization
   52          parameters, including zero.
   53     -->
   54 
   55     <context-param>
   56       <param-name>webmaster</param-name>
   57       <param-value>myaddress@mycompany.com</param-value>
   58       <description>
   59         The EMAIL address of the administrator to whom questions
   60         and comments about this application should be addressed.
   61       </description>
   62     </context-param>
   63 
   64 
   65     <!-- Servlet definitions for the servlets that make up
   66          your web application, including initialization
   67          parameters.  With Tomcat, you can also send requests
   68          to servlets not listed here with a request like this:
   69 
   70            http://localhost:8080/{context-path}/servlet/{classname}
   71 
   72          but this usage is not guaranteed to be portable.  It also
   73          makes relative references to images and other resources
   74          required by your servlet more complicated, so defining
   75          all of your servlets (and defining a mapping to them with
   76          a servlet-mapping element) is recommended.
   77 
   78          Servlet initialization parameters can be retrieved in a
   79          servlet or JSP page by calling:
   80 
   81              String value =
   82                getServletConfig().getInitParameter("name");
   83 
   84          where "name" matches the <param-name> element of
   85          one of these initialization parameters.
   86 
   87          You can define any number of servlets, including zero.
   88     -->
   89 
   90     <servlet>
   91       <servlet-name>controller</servlet-name>
   92       <description>
   93         This servlet plays the "controller" role in the MVC architecture
   94         used in this application.  It is generally mapped to the ".do"
   95         filename extension with a servlet-mapping element, and all form
   96         submits in the app will be submitted to a request URI like
   97         "saveCustomer.do", which will therefore be mapped to this servlet.
   98 
   99         The initialization parameter names for this servlet are the
  100         "servlet path" that will be received by this servlet (after the
  101         filename extension is removed).  The corresponding value is the
  102         name of the action class that will be used to process this request.
  103       </description>
  104       <servlet-class>com.mycompany.mypackage.ControllerServlet</servlet-class>
  105       <init-param>
  106         <param-name>listOrders</param-name>
  107         <param-value>com.mycompany.myactions.ListOrdersAction</param-value>
  108       </init-param>
  109       <init-param>
  110         <param-name>saveCustomer</param-name>
  111         <param-value>com.mycompany.myactions.SaveCustomerAction</param-value>
  112       </init-param>
  113       <!-- Load this servlet at server startup time -->
  114       <load-on-startup>5</load-on-startup>
  115     </servlet>
  116 
  117     <servlet>
  118       <servlet-name>graph</servlet-name>
  119       <description>
  120         This servlet produces GIF images that are dynamically generated
  121         graphs, based on the input parameters included on the request.
  122         It is generally mapped to a specific request URI like "/graph".
  123       </description>
  124     </servlet>
  125 
  126 
  127     <!-- Define mappings that are used by the servlet container to
  128          translate a particular request URI (context-relative) to a
  129          particular servlet.  The examples below correspond to the
  130          servlet descriptions above.  Thus, a request URI like:
  131 
  132            http://localhost:8080/{contextpath}/graph
  133 
  134          will be mapped to the "graph" servlet, while a request like:
  135 
  136            http://localhost:8080/{contextpath}/saveCustomer.do
  137 
  138          will be mapped to the "controller" servlet.
  139 
  140          You may define any number of servlet mappings, including zero.
  141          It is also legal to define more than one mapping for the same
  142          servlet, if you wish to.
  143     -->
  144 
  145     <servlet-mapping>
  146       <servlet-name>controller</servlet-name>
  147       <url-pattern>*.do</url-pattern>
  148     </servlet-mapping>
  149 
  150     <servlet-mapping>
  151       <servlet-name>graph</servlet-name>
  152       <url-pattern>/graph</url-pattern>
  153     </servlet-mapping>
  154 
  155 
  156     <!-- Define the default session timeout for your application,
  157          in minutes.  From a servlet or JSP page, you can modify
  158          the timeout for a particular session dynamically by using
  159          HttpSession.getMaxInactiveInterval(). -->
  160 
  161     <session-config>
  162       <session-timeout>30</session-timeout>    <!-- 30 minutes -->
  163     </session-config>
  164 
  165 
  166 </web-app>