Catalog Services for the Web (CSW) features

Supported operations

The following standard CSW operations are currently supported:

  • GetCapabilities
  • GetRecords
  • GetRecordById
  • GetDomain
  • DescribeRecord

(Starting with GeoServer 2.9.x, a new vendor operation has been added: DirectDownload)

The Internal Catalog Store supports filtering on both full x-paths as well as the “Queryables” specified in GetCapabilities.

Catalog stores

The default catalog store is the Internal Catalog Store, which retrieves information from the GeoServer’s internal catalog. The Simple Catalog Store (simple-store module) adds an alternative simple store which reads the catalog data directly from files (mainly used for testing).

If there are multiple catalog stores present (for example, when the Simple Catalog Store module is loaded), set the Java system property DefaultCatalogStore to make sure that the correct catalog store will be used. To use the Internal Catalog Store, this property must be set to:

DefaultCatalogStore=org.geoserver.csw.store.internal.InternalCatalogStore

To use the Simple Catalog Store:

DefaultCatalogStore=org.geoserver.csw.store.simple.GeoServerSimpleCatalogStore

Supported schemes

The Internal Catalog Store currently supports two metadata schemes:

Mapping Files

Mapping files are located in the csw directory inside the GeoServer data directory. Each mapping file must have the exact name of the record type name combined with the .properties extension. For example:

The mapping files take the syntax from Java properties files. The left side of the equals sign specifies the target field name or path in the metadata record, paths being separated with dots. The right side of the equals sign specifies any CQL expression that denotes the value of the target property. The CQL expression is applied to each ResourceInfo object in the catalog and can retrieve all properties from this object. These expressions can make use of literals, properties present in the ResourceInfo object, and all normal CQL operators and functions. There is also support for complex datastructures such as Maps using the dot notation and Lists using the bracket notation (Example mapping files are given below).

The properties in the ResourceInfo object that can be used are:

name
qualifiedName
nativeName
qualifiedNativeName
alias
title
abstract
description
metadata.?
namespace
namespace.prefix
namespace.name
namespace.uri
namespace.metadata.?
keywords
keywords[?]
keywords[?].value
keywords[?].language
keywords[?].vocabulary
keywordValues
keywordValues[?]
metadataLinks
metadataLinks[?]
metadataLinks[?].id
metadataLinks[?].about
metadataLinks[?].metadataType
metadataLinks[?].type
metadataLinks[?].content
latLonBoundingBox
latLonBoundingBox.dimension
latLonBoundingBox.lowerCorner
latLonBoundingBox.upperCorner
nativeBoundingBox
nativeBoundingBox.dimension
nativeBoundingBox.lowerCorner
nativeBoundingBox.upperCorner
srs
nativeCrs
projectionPolicy
enabled
advertised
catalog.defaultNamespace
catalog.defaultWorkspace
store.name
store.description
store.type
store.metadata.?
store.enabled
store.workspace
store.workspace.name
store.metadata.?
store.connectionParameters.?
store.error

Depending on whether the resource is a FeatureTypeInfo or a CoverageInfo, additional properties may be taken from their respective object structure. You may use REST to view an xml model of feature types and datastores in which the xml tags represent the available properties in the objects.

Some fields in the metadata schemes can have multiple occurences. They may be mapped to properties in the Catalog model that are also multi-valued, such as for example keywords. It is also possible to use a filter function called list to map multiple single-valued or multi-valued catalog properties to a MetaData field with multiple occurences (see in ISO MetaData Profile example, mapping for the identificationInfo.AbstractMD_Identification.citation.CI_Citation.alternateTitle field).

Placing the @ symbol in front of the field will set that to use as identifier for each metadata record. This may be useful for ID filters. Use a $ sign in front of fields that are required to make sure the mapping is aware of the requirement (specifically for the purpose of property selection).

Below is an example of a Dublin Core mapping file:

@identifier.value=id
title.value=title
creator.value='GeoServer Catalog'
subject.value=keywords
subject.scheme='http://www.digest.org/2.1'
abstract.value=abstract
description.value=strConcat('description about ' , title)
date.value="metadata.date"
type.value='http://purl.org/dc/dcmitype/Dataset'
publisher.value='Niels Charlier'
#format.value=
#language.value=
#coverage.value=
#source.value=
#relation.value=
#rights.value=
#contributor.value=

All fields have the form of <fieldname>.value for the actual value in the field. Additionally <fieldname>.scheme can be specified for the @scheme attribute of this field.

Examples of attributes extracted from the ResourceInfo are id, title, and keywords, etc. The attribute metadata.date uses the metadata (java.util.)Map from the Resource object. In this map, it searches for the keyword “date”.

Note that double quotes are necessary in order to preserve this meaning of the dots.