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    1 """A setuptools based setup module.
    2 See:
    3 https://packaging.python.org/en/latest/distributing.html
    4 https://github.com/pypa/sampleproject
    5 """
    6 
    7 # Always prefer setuptools over distutils
    8 import setuptools
    9 # To use a consistent encoding
   10 import codecs
   11 import os
   12 
   13 here = os.path.abspath(os.path.dirname(__file__))
   14 
   15 # Get the long description from the README file
   16 with codecs.open(os.path.join(here, 'README.md'), encoding='utf-8') as f:
   17     long_description = f.read()
   18 
   19 # Arguments marked as "Required" below must be included for upload to PyPI.
   20 # Fields marked as "Optional" may be commented out.
   21 
   22 setuptools.setup(
   23     # This is the name of your project. The first time you publish this
   24     # package, this name will be registered for you. It will determine how
   25     # users can install this project, e.g.:
   26     #
   27     # $ pip install sampleproject
   28     #
   29     # And where it will live on PyPI: https://pypi.org/project/sampleproject/
   30     #
   31     # There are some restrictions on what makes a valid project name
   32     # specification here:
   33     # https://packaging.python.org/specifications/core-metadata/#name
   34     name='program_versions',  # Required
   35 
   36     # Versions should comply with PEP 440:
   37     # https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0440/
   38     #
   39     # For a discussion on single-sourcing the version across setup.py and the
   40     # project code, see
   41     # https://packaging.python.org/en/latest/single_source_version.html
   42     version='1.5.5',  # Required
   43 
   44     # This is a one-line description or tagline of what your project does. This
   45     # corresponds to the "Summary" metadata field:
   46     # https://packaging.python.org/specifications/core-metadata/#summary
   47     description='Know version changes of your favourites projects in your terminal.',  # Required
   48 
   49     # This is an optional longer description of your project that represents
   50     # the body of text which users will see when they visit PyPI.
   51     #
   52     # Often, this is the same as your README, so you can just read it in from
   53     # that file directly (as we have already done above)
   54     #
   55     # This field corresponds to the "Description" metadata field:
   56     # https://packaging.python.org/specifications/core-metadata/#description-optional
   57     long_description=long_description,  # Optional
   58     long_description_content_type="text/markdown",
   59 
   60     # This should be a valid link to your project's main homepage.
   61     #
   62     # This field corresponds to the "Home-Page" metadata field:
   63     # https://packaging.python.org/specifications/core-metadata/#home-page-optional
   64     url='https://github.com/dupgit/versions',  # Optional
   65 
   66     # This should be your name or the name of the organization which owns the
   67     # project.
   68     author='Olivier Delhomme',  # Optional
   69 
   70     # This should be a valid email address corresponding to the author listed
   71     # above.
   72     author_email='olivier.delhomme@free.fr',  # Optional
   73 
   74     # Classifiers help users find your project by categorizing it.
   75     #
   76     # For a list of valid classifiers, see
   77     # https://pypi.python.org/pypi?%3Aaction=list_classifiers
   78     classifiers=[  # Optional
   79         # How mature is this project? Common values are
   80         #   3 - Alpha
   81         #   4 - Beta
   82         #   5 - Production/Stable
   83         'Development Status :: 5 - Production/Stable',
   84 
   85         # Indicate who your project is intended for
   86         'Intended Audience :: Developers',
   87         'Intended Audience :: Information Technology',
   88         'Intended Audience :: System Administrators',
   89         'Intended Audience :: Science/Research',
   90 
   91         'Topic :: Software Development :: Version Control',
   92 
   93         # Pick your license as you wish
   94         'License :: OSI Approved :: GNU General Public License v3 or later (GPLv3+)',
   95 
   96         # Specify the Python versions you support here. In particular, ensure
   97         # that you indicate whether you support Python 2, Python 3 or both.
   98         'Programming Language :: Python :: 2',
   99         'Programming Language :: Python :: 2.7',
  100         'Programming Language :: Python :: 3',
  101         'Programming Language :: Python :: 3.4',
  102         'Programming Language :: Python :: 3.5',
  103         'Programming Language :: Python :: 3.6',
  104         'Programming Language :: Python :: 3.7',
  105     ],
  106 
  107     # This field adds keywords for your project which will appear on the
  108     # project page. What does your project relate to?
  109     #
  110     # Note that this is a string of words separated by whitespace, not a list.
  111     keywords='version-checker version follower rss atom command-line',  # Optional
  112 
  113     # You can just specify package directories manually here if your project is
  114     # simple. Or you can use find_packages().
  115     #
  116     # Alternatively, if you just want to distribute a single Python file, use
  117     # the `py_modules` argument instead as follows, which will expect a file
  118     # called `my_module.py` to exist:
  119     #
  120     # py_modules=['versions', 'configuration', 'common', 'bylist', 'byproject', 'caches'],
  121 
  122     packages=setuptools.find_packages(exclude=['tests']),  # Required
  123 
  124     # This field lists other packages that your project depends on to run.
  125     # Any package you put here will be installed by pip when your project is
  126     # installed, so they must be valid existing projects.
  127     #
  128     # For an analysis of "install_requires" vs pip's requirements files see:
  129     # https://packaging.python.org/en/latest/requirements.html
  130     install_requires=['feedparser>=5.1.3', 'PyYAML>=3.11'],  # Optional
  131 
  132     # List additional groups of dependencies here (e.g. development
  133     # dependencies). Users will be able to install these using the "extras"
  134     # syntax, for example:
  135     #
  136     #   $ pip install sampleproject[dev]
  137     #
  138     # Similar to `install_requires` above, these must be valid existing
  139     # projects.
  140     # extras_require={  # Optional
  141     #    'dev': ['check-manifest'],
  142     #    'test': ['coverage'],
  143     # },
  144 
  145     # If there are data files included in your packages that need to be
  146     # installed, specify them here.
  147     #
  148     # If using Python 2.6 or earlier, then these have to be included in
  149     # MANIFEST.in as well.
  150     # package_data={  # Optional
  151     #    'sample': ['package_data.dat'],
  152     # },
  153 
  154     # Although 'package_data' is the preferred approach, in some case you may
  155     # need to place data files outside of your packages. See:
  156     # http://docs.python.org/3.4/distutils/setupscript.html#installing-additional-files
  157     #
  158     # In this case, 'data_file' will be installed into '<sys.prefix>/my_data'
  159     # data_files=[('my_data', ['data/data_file'])],  # Optional
  160 
  161     # To provide executable scripts, use entry points in preference to the
  162     # "scripts" keyword. Entry points provide cross-platform support and allow
  163     # `pip` to create the appropriate form of executable for the target
  164     # platform.
  165     #
  166     # For example, the following would provide a command called `sample` which
  167     # executes the function `main` from this package when invoked:
  168     entry_points={  # Optional
  169         'console_scripts': [
  170             'versions=versions.versions:main',
  171         ],
  172     },
  173 )