dlib  19.17
About: dlib is a general purpose cross-platform C++ library designed using contract programming and modern C++ techniques. It supports networking, threads, graphical interfaces, data structures, linear algebra, machine learning, XML and text parsing, numerical optimization, Bayesian nets, and numerous other tasks.
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README.md

dlib C++ library Travis Status

Dlib is a modern C++ toolkit containing machine learning algorithms and tools for creating complex software in C++ to solve real world problems. See http://dlib.net for the main project documentation and API reference.

Compiling dlib C++ example programs

Go into the examples folder and type:

mkdir build; cd build; cmake .. ; cmake --build .

That will build all the examples. If you have a CPU that supports AVX instructions then turn them on like this:

mkdir build; cd build; cmake .. -DUSE_AVX_INSTRUCTIONS=1; cmake --build .

Doing so will make some things run faster.

Finally, Visual Studio users should usually do everything in 64bit mode. By default Visual Studio is 32bit, both in its outputs and its own execution, so you have to explicitly tell it to use 64bits. Since it's not the 1990s anymore you probably want to use 64bits. Do that with a cmake invocation like this:

cmake .. -G "Visual Studio 14 2015 Win64" -T host=x64 

Compiling your own C++ programs that use dlib

The examples folder has a CMake tutorial that tells you what to do. There are also additional instructions on the dlib web site.

Compiling dlib Python API

Before you can run the Python example programs you must compile dlib. Type:

python setup.py install

Running the unit test suite

Type the following to compile and run the dlib unit test suite:

cd dlib/test
mkdir build
cd build
cmake ..
cmake --build . --config Release
./dtest --runall

Note that on windows your compiler might put the test executable in a subfolder called Release. If that's the case then you have to go to that folder before running the test.

This library is licensed under the Boost Software License, which can be found in dlib/LICENSE.txt. The long and short of the license is that you can use dlib however you like, even in closed source commercial software.

dlib sponsors

This research is based in part upon work supported by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) under contract number 2014-14071600010. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the U.S. Government.

Version: 19.17 Date: Sun Mar 10 11:09:53 EDT 2019 Mercurial Revision ID: 590a9a11b198ef7ecc3cbebb819c54816829fb4c