"Fossies" - the Fresh Open Source Software Archive  

Source code changes of the file "man/lispref/os.texi" between
xemacs-21.4.22.tar.gz and xemacs-21.4.24.tar.bz2

About: XEmacs (an alternative to GNU Emacs) is a highly customizable open source text editor and application development system (current version).

os.texi  (xemacs-21.4.22):os.texi  (xemacs-21.4.24.tar.bz2)
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* Timers:: Setting a timer to call a function at a certain time. * Timers:: Setting a timer to call a function at a certain time.
* Terminal Input:: Recording terminal input for debugging. * Terminal Input:: Recording terminal input for debugging.
* Terminal Output:: Recording terminal output for debugging. * Terminal Output:: Recording terminal output for debugging.
* Flow Control:: How to turn output flow control on or off. * Flow Control:: How to turn output flow control on or off.
* Batch Mode:: Running XEmacs without terminal interaction. * Batch Mode:: Running XEmacs without terminal interaction.
@end menu @end menu
@ignore @ignore
* Special Keysyms:: Defining system-specific key symbols for X windows. * Special Keysyms:: Defining system-specific key symbols for X windows.
@end ignore @end ignore
@node Starting Up @node Starting Up, Getting Out, System Interface, System Interface
@section Starting Up XEmacs @section Starting Up XEmacs
This section describes what XEmacs does when it is started, and how you This section describes what XEmacs does when it is started, and how you
can customize these actions. can customize these actions.
@menu @menu
* Start-up Summary:: Sequence of actions XEmacs performs at start-up. * Start-up Summary:: Sequence of actions XEmacs performs at start-up.
* Init File:: Details on reading the init file (@file{.emacs}). * Init File:: Details on reading the init file (@file{.emacs}).
* Terminal-Specific:: How the terminal-specific Lisp file is read. * Terminal-Specific:: How the terminal-specific Lisp file is read.
* Command Line Arguments:: How command line arguments are processed, * Command Line Arguments:: How command line arguments are processed,
and how you can customize them. and how you can customize them.
@end menu @end menu
@node Start-up Summary @node Start-up Summary, Init File, Starting Up, Starting Up
@subsection Summary: Sequence of Actions at Start Up @subsection Summary: Sequence of Actions at Start Up
@cindex initialization @cindex initialization
@cindex start up of XEmacs @cindex start up of XEmacs
@cindex @file{startup.el} @cindex @file{startup.el}
The order of operations performed (in @file{startup.el}) by XEmacs when The order of operations performed (in @file{startup.el}) by XEmacs when
it is started up is as follows: it is started up is as follows:
@enumerate @enumerate
@item @item
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Simply setting @code{inhibit-startup-echo-area-message} to your login Simply setting @code{inhibit-startup-echo-area-message} to your login
name is not sufficient to inhibit the message; Emacs explicitly checks name is not sufficient to inhibit the message; Emacs explicitly checks
whether @file{.emacs} contains an expression as shown above. Your login whether @file{.emacs} contains an expression as shown above. Your login
name must appear in the expression as a Lisp string constant. name must appear in the expression as a Lisp string constant.
This way, you can easily inhibit the message for yourself if you wish, This way, you can easily inhibit the message for yourself if you wish,
but thoughtless copying of your @file{.emacs} file will not inhibit the but thoughtless copying of your @file{.emacs} file will not inhibit the
message for someone else. message for someone else.
@end defopt @end defopt
@node Init File @node Init File, Terminal-Specific, Start-up Summary, Starting Up
@subsection The Init File: @file{.emacs} @subsection The Init File: @file{.emacs}
@cindex init file @cindex init file
@cindex @file{.emacs} @cindex @file{.emacs}
When you start XEmacs, it normally attempts to load the file When you start XEmacs, it normally attempts to load the file
@file{.emacs} from your home directory. This file, if it exists, must @file{.emacs} from your home directory. This file, if it exists, must
contain Lisp code. It is called your @dfn{init file}. The command line contain Lisp code. It is called your @dfn{init file}. The command line
switches @samp{-q} and @samp{-u} affect the use of the init file; switches @samp{-q} and @samp{-u} affect the use of the init file;
@samp{-q} says not to load an init file, and @samp{-u} says to load a @samp{-q} says not to load an init file, and @samp{-u} says to load a
specified user's init file instead of yours. @xref{Entering XEmacs,,, specified user's init file instead of yours. @xref{Entering XEmacs,,,
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then the default library is not loaded. The default value is then the default library is not loaded. The default value is
@code{nil}. @code{nil}.
@end defopt @end defopt
@defvar before-init-hook @defvar before-init-hook
@defvarx after-init-hook @defvarx after-init-hook
These two normal hooks are run just before, and just after, loading of These two normal hooks are run just before, and just after, loading of
the user's init file, @file{default.el}, and/or @file{site-start.el}. the user's init file, @file{default.el}, and/or @file{site-start.el}.
@end defvar @end defvar
@node Terminal-Specific @node Terminal-Specific, Command Line Arguments, Init File, Starting Up
@subsection Terminal-Specific Initialization @subsection Terminal-Specific Initialization
@cindex terminal-specific initialization @cindex terminal-specific initialization
Each terminal type can have its own Lisp library that XEmacs loads when Each terminal type can have its own Lisp library that XEmacs loads when
run on that type of terminal. For a terminal type named @var{termtype}, run on that type of terminal. For a terminal type named @var{termtype},
the library is called @file{term/@var{termtype}}. XEmacs finds the file the library is called @file{term/@var{termtype}}. XEmacs finds the file
by searching the @code{load-path} directories as it does for other by searching the @code{load-path} directories as it does for other
files, and trying the @samp{.elc} and @samp{.el} suffixes. Normally, files, and trying the @samp{.elc} and @samp{.el} suffixes. Normally,
terminal-specific Lisp library is located in @file{emacs/lisp/term}, a terminal-specific Lisp library is located in @file{emacs/lisp/term}, a
subdirectory of the @file{emacs/lisp} directory in which most XEmacs Lisp subdirectory of the @file{emacs/lisp} directory in which most XEmacs Lisp
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terminal-specific file. terminal-specific file.
@end defvar @end defvar
@defvar window-setup-hook @defvar window-setup-hook
This variable is a normal hook which XEmacs runs after loading your This variable is a normal hook which XEmacs runs after loading your
@file{.emacs} file and the default initialization file (if any), after @file{.emacs} file and the default initialization file (if any), after
loading terminal-specific Lisp code, and after running the hook loading terminal-specific Lisp code, and after running the hook
@code{term-setup-hook}. @code{term-setup-hook}.
@end defvar @end defvar
@node Command Line Arguments @node Command Line Arguments, , Terminal-Specific, Starting Up
@subsection Command Line Arguments @subsection Command Line Arguments
@cindex command line arguments @cindex command line arguments
You can use command line arguments to request various actions when you You can use command line arguments to request various actions when you
start XEmacs. Since you do not need to start XEmacs more than once per start XEmacs. Since you do not need to start XEmacs more than once per
day, and will often leave your XEmacs session running longer than that, day, and will often leave your XEmacs session running longer than that,
command line arguments are hardly ever used. As a practical matter, it command line arguments are hardly ever used. As a practical matter, it
is best to avoid making the habit of using them, since this habit would is best to avoid making the habit of using them, since this habit would
encourage you to kill and restart XEmacs unnecessarily often. These encourage you to kill and restart XEmacs unnecessarily often. These
options exist for two reasons: to be compatible with other editors (for options exist for two reasons: to be compatible with other editors (for
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When a function recognizes and processes the argument in @code{argi}, it When a function recognizes and processes the argument in @code{argi}, it
should return a non-@code{nil} value to say it has dealt with that should return a non-@code{nil} value to say it has dealt with that
argument. If it has also dealt with some of the following arguments, it argument. If it has also dealt with some of the following arguments, it
can indicate that by deleting them from @code{command-line-args-left}. can indicate that by deleting them from @code{command-line-args-left}.
If all of these functions return @code{nil}, then the argument is used If all of these functions return @code{nil}, then the argument is used
as a file name to visit. as a file name to visit.
@end defvar @end defvar
@node Getting Out @node Getting Out, System Environment, Starting Up, System Interface
@section Getting out of XEmacs @section Getting out of XEmacs
@cindex exiting XEmacs @cindex exiting XEmacs
There are two ways to get out of XEmacs: you can kill the XEmacs job, There are two ways to get out of XEmacs: you can kill the XEmacs job,
which exits permanently, or you can suspend it, which permits you to which exits permanently, or you can suspend it, which permits you to
reenter the XEmacs process later. As a practical matter, you seldom kill reenter the XEmacs process later. As a practical matter, you seldom kill
XEmacs---only when you are about to log out. Suspending is much more XEmacs---only when you are about to log out. Suspending is much more
common. common.
@menu @menu
* Killing XEmacs:: Exiting XEmacs irreversibly. * Killing XEmacs:: Exiting XEmacs irreversibly.
* Suspending XEmacs:: Exiting XEmacs reversibly. * Suspending XEmacs:: Exiting XEmacs reversibly.
@end menu @end menu
@node Killing XEmacs @node Killing XEmacs, Suspending XEmacs, Getting Out, Getting Out
@subsection Killing XEmacs @subsection Killing XEmacs
@cindex killing XEmacs @cindex killing XEmacs
Killing XEmacs means ending the execution of the XEmacs process. The Killing XEmacs means ending the execution of the XEmacs process. The
parent process normally resumes control. The low-level primitive for parent process normally resumes control. The low-level primitive for
killing XEmacs is @code{kill-emacs}. killing XEmacs is @code{kill-emacs}.
@deffn Command kill-emacs &optional exit-data @deffn Command kill-emacs &optional exit-data
This function exits the XEmacs process and kills it. This function exits the XEmacs process and kills it.
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additional confirmation from the user. If any of them returns additional confirmation from the user. If any of them returns
non-@code{nil}, XEmacs is not killed. non-@code{nil}, XEmacs is not killed.
@end defvar @end defvar
@defvar kill-emacs-hook @defvar kill-emacs-hook
This variable is a normal hook; once @code{save-buffers-kill-emacs} is This variable is a normal hook; once @code{save-buffers-kill-emacs} is
finished with all file saving and confirmation, it runs the functions in finished with all file saving and confirmation, it runs the functions in
this hook. this hook.
@end defvar @end defvar
@node Suspending XEmacs @node Suspending XEmacs, , Killing XEmacs, Getting Out
@subsection Suspending XEmacs @subsection Suspending XEmacs
@cindex suspending XEmacs @cindex suspending XEmacs
@dfn{Suspending XEmacs} means stopping XEmacs temporarily and returning @dfn{Suspending XEmacs} means stopping XEmacs temporarily and returning
control to its superior process, which is usually the shell. This control to its superior process, which is usually the shell. This
allows you to resume editing later in the same XEmacs process, with the allows you to resume editing later in the same XEmacs process, with the
same buffers, the same kill ring, the same undo history, and so on. To same buffers, the same kill ring, the same undo history, and so on. To
resume XEmacs, use the appropriate command in the parent shell---most resume XEmacs, use the appropriate command in the parent shell---most
likely @code{fg}. likely @code{fg}.
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@end deffn @end deffn
@defvar suspend-hook @defvar suspend-hook
This variable is a normal hook run before suspending. This variable is a normal hook run before suspending.
@end defvar @end defvar
@defvar suspend-resume-hook @defvar suspend-resume-hook
This variable is a normal hook run after suspending. This variable is a normal hook run after suspending.
@end defvar @end defvar
@node System Environment @node System Environment, User Identification, Getting Out, System Interface
@section Operating System Environment @section Operating System Environment
@cindex operating system environment @cindex operating system environment
XEmacs provides access to variables in the operating system environment XEmacs provides access to variables in the operating system environment
through various functions. These variables include the name of the through various functions. These variables include the name of the
system, the user's @sc{uid}, and so on. system, the user's @sc{uid}, and so on.
@defvar system-type @defvar system-type
The value of this variable is a symbol indicating the type of operating The value of this variable is a symbol indicating the type of operating
system XEmacs is operating on. Here is a table of the possible values: system XEmacs is operating on. Here is a table of the possible values:
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On some systems, this function may require special privileges to run, or On some systems, this function may require special privileges to run, or
it may be unimplemented for the particular system type. In that case, it may be unimplemented for the particular system type. In that case,
the function will signal an error. the function will signal an error.
@end defun @end defun
@defun emacs-pid @defun emacs-pid
This function returns the process @sc{id} of the Emacs process. This function returns the process @sc{id} of the Emacs process.
@end defun @end defun
@node User Identification @node User Identification, Time of Day, System Environment, System Interface
@section User Identification @section User Identification
@defvar user-mail-address @defvar user-mail-address
This holds the nominal email address of the user who is using Emacs. This holds the nominal email address of the user who is using Emacs.
When Emacs starts up, it computes a default value that is usually right, When Emacs starts up, it computes a default value that is usually right,
but users often set this themselves when the default value is not right. but users often set this themselves when the default value is not right.
@end defvar @end defvar
@defun user-login-name &optional uid @defun user-login-name &optional uid
If you don't specify @var{uid}, this function returns the name under If you don't specify @var{uid}, this function returns the name under
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If the environment variables @code{HOMEDRIVE} and @code{HOMEPATH} are If the environment variables @code{HOMEDRIVE} and @code{HOMEPATH} are
both set, return the concatenation (the following description uses MS both set, return the concatenation (the following description uses MS
Windows environment variable substitution syntax): Windows environment variable substitution syntax):
@code{%HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH%}. @code{%HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH%}.
@item @item
Return ``C:\'', as a fallback, but issue a warning. Return ``C:\'', as a fallback, but issue a warning.
@end enumerate @end enumerate
@end defun @end defun
@node Time of Day @node Time of Day, Time Conversion, User Identification, System Interface
@section Time of Day @section Time of Day
This section explains how to determine the current time and the time This section explains how to determine the current time and the time
zone. zone.
@defun current-time-string &optional time-value @defun current-time-string &optional time-value
This function returns the current time and date as a humanly-readable This function returns the current time and date as a humanly-readable
string. The format of the string is unvarying; the number of characters string. The format of the string is unvarying; the number of characters
used for each part is always the same, so you can reliably use used for each part is always the same, so you can reliably use
@code{substring} to extract pieces of it. It is wise to count the @code{substring} to extract pieces of it. It is wise to count the
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If the operating system doesn't supply all the information necessary to If the operating system doesn't supply all the information necessary to
compute the value, both elements of the list are @code{nil}. compute the value, both elements of the list are @code{nil}.
The argument @var{time-value}, if given, specifies a time to analyze The argument @var{time-value}, if given, specifies a time to analyze
instead of the current time. The argument should be a cons cell instead of the current time. The argument should be a cons cell
containing two integers, or a list whose first two elements are containing two integers, or a list whose first two elements are
integers. Thus, you can use times obtained from @code{current-time} integers. Thus, you can use times obtained from @code{current-time}
(see above) and from @code{file-attributes} (@pxref{File Attributes}). (see above) and from @code{file-attributes} (@pxref{File Attributes}).
@end defun @end defun
@node Time Conversion @node Time Conversion, Timers, Time of Day, System Interface
@section Time Conversion @section Time Conversion
These functions convert time values (lists of two or three integers) These functions convert time values (lists of two or three integers)
to strings or to calendrical information. There is also a function to to strings or to calendrical information. There is also a function to
convert calendrical information to a time value. You can get time convert calendrical information to a time value. You can get time
values from the functions @code{current-time} (@pxref{Time of Day}) and values from the functions @code{current-time} (@pxref{Time of Day}) and
@code{file-attributes} (@pxref{File Attributes}). @code{file-attributes} (@pxref{File Attributes}).
@defun format-time-string format-string &optional time @defun format-time-string format-string &optional time
This function converts @var{time} to a string according to This function converts @var{time} to a string according to
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you want them to stand for years above 1900, you must alter them yourself you want them to stand for years above 1900, you must alter them yourself
before you call @code{encode-time}. before you call @code{encode-time}.
The optional argument @var{zone} defaults to the current time zone and The optional argument @var{zone} defaults to the current time zone and
its daylight savings time rules. If specified, it can be either a list its daylight savings time rules. If specified, it can be either a list
(as you would get from @code{current-time-zone}) or an integer (as you (as you would get from @code{current-time-zone}) or an integer (as you
would get from @code{decode-time}). The specified zone is used without would get from @code{decode-time}). The specified zone is used without
any further alteration for daylight savings time. any further alteration for daylight savings time.
@end defun @end defun
@node Timers @node Timers, Terminal Input, Time Conversion, System Interface
@section Timers for Delayed Execution @section Timers for Delayed Execution
You can set up a timer to call a function at a specified future time. You can set up a timer to call a function at a specified future time.
@c All different in FSF 19 @c All different in FSF 19
@defun add-timeout secs function object &optional resignal @defun add-timeout secs function object &optional resignal
This function adds a timeout, to be signaled after the timeout period This function adds a timeout, to be signaled after the timeout period
has elapsed. @var{secs} is a number of seconds, expressed as an integer has elapsed. @var{secs} is a number of seconds, expressed as an integer
or a float. @var{function} will be called after that many seconds have or a float. @var{function} will be called after that many seconds have
elapsed, with one argument, the given @var{object}. If the optional elapsed, with one argument, the given @var{object}. If the optional
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@end defun @end defun
@defun disable-timeout id @defun disable-timeout id
Cancel the requested action for @var{id}, which should be a value Cancel the requested action for @var{id}, which should be a value
previously returned by @code{add-timeout}. This cancels the effect of previously returned by @code{add-timeout}. This cancels the effect of
that call to @code{add-timeout}; the arrival of the specified time will that call to @code{add-timeout}; the arrival of the specified time will
not cause anything special to happen. not cause anything special to happen.
(NOTE: In FSF Emacs, this function is called @code{cancel-timer}.) (NOTE: In FSF Emacs, this function is called @code{cancel-timer}.)
@end defun @end defun
@node Terminal Input @node Terminal Input, Terminal Output, Timers, System Interface
@section Terminal Input @section Terminal Input
@cindex terminal input @cindex terminal input
This section describes functions and variables for recording or This section describes functions and variables for recording or
manipulating terminal input. See @ref{Display}, for related manipulating terminal input. See @ref{Display}, for related
functions. functions.
@menu @menu
* Input Modes:: Options for how input is processed. * Input Modes:: Options for how input is processed.
* Translating Input:: Low level conversion of some characters or events * Translating Input:: Low level conversion of some characters or events
into others. into others.
* Recording Input:: Saving histories of recent or all input events. * Recording Input:: Saving histories of recent or all input events.
@end menu @end menu
@node Input Modes @node Input Modes, Translating Input, Terminal Input, Terminal Input
@subsection Input Modes @subsection Input Modes
@cindex input modes @cindex input modes
@cindex terminal input modes @cindex terminal input modes
@defun set-input-mode interrupt flow meta &optional quit-char console @defun set-input-mode interrupt flow meta &optional quit-char console
This function sets the mode for reading keyboard input. If This function sets the mode for reading keyboard input. If
@var{interrupt} is non-null, then XEmacs uses input interrupts. If it is @var{interrupt} is non-null, then XEmacs uses input interrupts. If it is
@code{nil}, then it uses @sc{cbreak} mode. When XEmacs communicates @code{nil}, then it uses @sc{cbreak} mode. When XEmacs communicates
directly with X, it ignores this argument and uses interrupts if that is directly with X, it ignores this argument and uses interrupts if that is
the way it knows how to communicate. the way it knows how to communicate.
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@item meta @item meta
is @code{t} if XEmacs treats the eighth bit of input characters as is @code{t} if XEmacs treats the eighth bit of input characters as
the meta bit; @code{nil} means XEmacs clears the eighth bit of every the meta bit; @code{nil} means XEmacs clears the eighth bit of every
input character; any other value means XEmacs uses all eight bits as the input character; any other value means XEmacs uses all eight bits as the
basic character code. basic character code.
@item quit @item quit
is the character XEmacs currently uses for quitting, usually @kbd{C-g}. is the character XEmacs currently uses for quitting, usually @kbd{C-g}.
@end table @end table
@end defun @end defun
@node Translating Input @node Translating Input, Recording Input, Input Modes, Terminal Input
@subsection Translating Input Events @subsection Translating Input Events
@cindex translating input events @cindex translating input events
This section describes features for translating input events into other This section describes features for translating input events into other
input events before they become part of key sequences. input events before they become part of key sequences.
@ignore Not in XEmacs yet. @ignore Not in XEmacs yet.
@c Emacs 19 feature @c Emacs 19 feature
@defvar extra-keyboard-modifiers @defvar extra-keyboard-modifiers
This variable lets Lisp programs ``press'' the modifier keys on the This variable lets Lisp programs ``press'' the modifier keys on the
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(define-key function-key-map "\C-ch" 'hyperify) (define-key function-key-map "\C-ch" 'hyperify)
@end group @end group
@end example @end example
@pindex iso-transl @pindex iso-transl
@cindex Latin-1 character set (input) @cindex Latin-1 character set (input)
@cindex ISO Latin-1 characters (input) @cindex ISO Latin-1 characters (input)
The @file{iso-transl} library uses this feature to provide a way of The @file{iso-transl} library uses this feature to provide a way of
inputting non-ASCII Latin-1 characters. inputting non-ASCII Latin-1 characters.
@node Recording Input @node Recording Input, , Translating Input, Terminal Input
@subsection Recording Input @subsection Recording Input
@defun recent-keys &optional number @defun recent-keys &optional number
This function returns a vector containing recent input events from the This function returns a vector containing recent input events from the
keyboard or mouse. By default, 100 events are recorded, which is how keyboard or mouse. By default, 100 events are recorded, which is how
many @code{recent-keys} returns. many @code{recent-keys} returns.
All input events are included, whether or not they were used as parts of All input events are included, whether or not they were used as parts of
key sequences. Thus, you always get the last 100 inputs, not counting key sequences. Thus, you always get the last 100 inputs, not counting
keyboard macros. (Events from keyboard macros are excluded because they keyboard macros. (Events from keyboard macros are excluded because they
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@example @example
@group @group
(open-dribble-file "~/dribble") (open-dribble-file "~/dribble")
@result{} nil @result{} nil
@end group @end group
@end example @end example
@end deffn @end deffn
See also the @code{open-termscript} function (@pxref{Terminal Output}). See also the @code{open-termscript} function (@pxref{Terminal Output}).
@node Terminal Output @node Terminal Output, , Terminal Input, System Interface
@section Terminal Output @section Terminal Output
@cindex terminal output @cindex terminal output
The terminal output functions send output to the terminal or keep The terminal output functions send output to the terminal or keep
track of output sent to the terminal. The function track of output sent to the terminal. The function
@code{device-baud-rate} tells you what XEmacs thinks is the output speed @code{device-baud-rate} tells you what XEmacs thinks is the output speed
of the terminal. of the terminal.
@defun device-baud-rate &optional device @defun device-baud-rate &optional device
This function's value is the output speed of the terminal associated This function's value is the output speed of the terminal associated
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@example @example
@group @group
(open-termscript "../junk/termscript") (open-termscript "../junk/termscript")
@result{} nil @result{} nil
@end group @end group
@end example @end example
@end deffn @end deffn
@ignore Not in XEmacs @ignore Not in XEmacs
@node Special Keysyms @node Special Keysyms, Flow Control, Terminal Output, System Interface
@section System-Specific X11 Keysyms @section System-Specific X11 Keysyms
To define system-specific X11 keysyms, set the variable To define system-specific X11 keysyms, set the variable
@code{system-key-alist}. @code{system-key-alist}.
@defvar system-key-alist @defvar system-key-alist
This variable's value should be an alist with one element for each This variable's value should be an alist with one element for each
system-specific keysym. An element has this form: @code{(@var{code} system-specific keysym. An element has this form: @code{(@var{code}
. @var{symbol})}, where @var{code} is the numeric keysym code (not . @var{symbol})}, where @var{code} is the numeric keysym code (not
including the ``vendor specific'' bit, 1 << 28), and @var{symbol} is the including the ``vendor specific'' bit, 1 << 28), and @var{symbol} is the
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It is not a problem if the alist defines keysyms for other X servers, as It is not a problem if the alist defines keysyms for other X servers, as
long as they don't conflict with the ones used by the X server actually long as they don't conflict with the ones used by the X server actually
in use. in use.
The variable is always local to the current X terminal and cannot be The variable is always local to the current X terminal and cannot be
buffer-local. @xref{Multiple Displays}. buffer-local. @xref{Multiple Displays}.
@end defvar @end defvar
@end ignore @end ignore
@node Flow Control @node Flow Control, Batch Mode, , System Interface
@section Flow Control @section Flow Control
@cindex flow control characters @cindex flow control characters
This section attempts to answer the question ``Why does XEmacs choose This section attempts to answer the question ``Why does XEmacs choose
to use flow-control characters in its command character set?'' For a to use flow-control characters in its command character set?'' For a
second view on this issue, read the comments on flow control in the second view on this issue, read the comments on flow control in the
@file{emacs/INSTALL} file from the distribution; for help with Termcap @file{emacs/INSTALL} file from the distribution; for help with Termcap
entries and DEC terminal concentrators, see @file{emacs/etc/TERMS}. entries and DEC terminal concentrators, see @file{emacs/etc/TERMS}.
@cindex @kbd{C-s} @cindex @kbd{C-s}
skipping to change at line 1671 skipping to change at line 1671
@xref{Translating Input}. @xref{Translating Input}.
@end enumerate @end enumerate
If the terminal is the source of the flow control characters, then once If the terminal is the source of the flow control characters, then once
you enable kernel flow control handling, you probably can make do with you enable kernel flow control handling, you probably can make do with
less padding than normal for that terminal. You can reduce the amount less padding than normal for that terminal. You can reduce the amount
of padding by customizing the Termcap entry. You can also reduce it by of padding by customizing the Termcap entry. You can also reduce it by
setting @code{baud-rate} to a smaller value so that XEmacs uses a smaller setting @code{baud-rate} to a smaller value so that XEmacs uses a smaller
speed when calculating the padding needed. @xref{Terminal Output}. speed when calculating the padding needed. @xref{Terminal Output}.
@node Batch Mode @node Batch Mode, , Flow Control, System Interface
@section Batch Mode @section Batch Mode
@cindex batch mode @cindex batch mode
@cindex noninteractive use @cindex noninteractive use
The command line option @samp{-batch} causes XEmacs to run The command line option @samp{-batch} causes XEmacs to run
noninteractively. In this mode, XEmacs does not read commands from the noninteractively. In this mode, XEmacs does not read commands from the
terminal, it does not alter the terminal modes, and it does not expect terminal, it does not alter the terminal modes, and it does not expect
to be outputting to an erasable screen. The idea is that you specify to be outputting to an erasable screen. The idea is that you specify
Lisp programs to run; when they are finished, XEmacs should exit. The Lisp programs to run; when they are finished, XEmacs should exit. The
way to specify the programs to run is with @samp{-l @var{file}}, which way to specify the programs to run is with @samp{-l @var{file}}, which
 End of changes. 21 change blocks. 
21 lines changed or deleted 21 lines changed or added

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